James Murphy

Pediatrician

James G. Murphy, MD, is a former Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. He served 25 years on active duty as a physician with the US Navy, 12 years as a contract pediatrician with the US Navy and 6 years as a Government Service Medical Officer with the Navy in San Diego, CA, until retiring from government service on 9-30-13. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, a Fellow of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, President of the San Diego County Breastfeeding Coalition, served one year on the Governing Council of the International Affiliation of Tongue Tie Professionals, is a member of the International Lactation Consultants Association and an Internationally Board Certified Lactation Consultant since 2009. Dr. Murphy began performing lingual frenulotomies in Oct 2003 and has performed over 3000 of these procedures to date including posterior sub-mucosal fibrous bands. He has also performed over 600 upper lip frenotomies using sterile scissors. He is the owner of Breastfeeding Fixers, which opened its doors in April 2014.

Episodes for this expert

  • The Truth About Baby Poop

    Dealing with your baby’s poop is just one of the many joys of new parenting. But besides being a bit gross, you can also learn a lot about your baby’s overall health. So, what should you expect within the first few weeks of birth? What do the different colors mean? What should you do if your baby is constipated? Plus, our panelists share their most memorable poop surprises!

  • Understanding Infant Growth Charts

    When you go to the pediatrician, they take all sorts of measurements and track your baby’s progress through infant growth charts. So, who created these charts and how are averages determined? Do breastfed babies grow any differently than formula fed babies? And what does the term “failure to thrive” actually mean?

  • Breastfeeding and Drinking Alcohol

    We’re often told to avoid alcohol when breastfeeding. That’s the “safe” answer, but it’s not always practical. So, if you’re going to have a drink, what do you need to know to protect your breast milk? How long should you wait to breastfeed your baby? How much alcohol is actually getting into your milk and how can that impact your baby?

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