Scott Koenig

Family Psychologist

Scott Koenig, Psy.D. is a licensed clinical psychologist providing individual, couples, and family therapy to children, adolescents, and adults. Dr. Koenig assists his clients in helping them recognize and reach their potential and become the best version of themselves. Dr. Koenig has a unique approach to helping clients leverage their strengths, while at the same time working through their emotional pain and/or behavioral concerns.

Some of Dr. Koenig’s specialty areas include: Depression, anxiety, anger management, behavior problems, fostering healthy communication, resolving relationship conflicts, low self-esteem, lack of motivation, ADHD behavioral strategies, addiction (e.g., substance abuse, eating disorders, gambling addiction etc.), parent education and intervention, behavior modification, social skills building, grief, loss, trauma, life transitions, adjustment concerns and personal growth.

Dr. Koenig recognizes that every person is unique and uses an individualized, yet eclectic approach to treatment. He views the therapeutic relationship as a collaborative one, and he will work with you to create a treatment plan that specifically addresses your needs. It is Dr. Koenig’s goal to provide a safe, secure, and confidential environment where you can share your thoughts and feelings without fear of judgment or blame.

Dr. Koenig received his doctorate in clinical psychology at Argosy University in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is a member of both the San Diego and California Psychological Association.

Episodes for this expert

  • Power Struggles with Your Children

    Power struggles while parenting is common, but it can also be stressful, unpleasant and negatively impact the relationship with your child? What’s really happening during these power struggles and how do you work through them?

  • Ease Your Child’s Separation Anxiety

    Tearful, tantrum-filled goodbyes are common during a child’s earliest years. Although it’s a normal and essential survival instinct, it can also be problematic. How can you help ease their separation anxiety and transition into a more independent stage in life?

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